The Masterpiece by Francine Rivers

978-1-4964-0790-0The Masterpiece is contemporary Christian fiction at its best. Having read and loved Redeeming Love, one of Rivers’s previous novels, I had an inkling that I would enjoy her newest work, fittingly titled The Masterpiece.

Many times Christian fiction can become a little too squeaky clean, which distracts from an exciting or enticing story line and pace. Being a Christian myself, I know that no one is perfect and Christians have just as many faults as everyone else. Therefore, Christian fiction should be real and not put on an act, pretending to be completely wholesome and pure. This is one of the reasons that I love Francine Rivers’s novels. Her characters all have major flaws and pasts that haunt them. Many times they feel like or even try giving up, but God is not done with them yet. Rivers has a knack for writing long books with unique plot lines and memorable characters, and The Masterpiece is no exception.

The Masterpiece is a story of survival, grief, forgiveness, family, and love. Famous LA artist, Roman Velasco has a very checkered past, even though his future looks bright to those who don’t really know him. The only person he lets get a little closer to him turns out to be a young, single mother named Grace, who becomes his personal assistant. Grace has been through many a tragedy and trial in her young life, but she knows and loves the Lord and leans on him in everything. Her parents died when she was a little girl, and God has become her one true father. Because of all the pain and bad relationships in her past, Grace keeps her distance and doesn’t have any interest in becoming romantically involved with anyone. Her only goal is to be able to support herself and her infant, Samuel, so that they can be together full time and she can be a devoted mother to him. She is determined not to let her past dictate her future. Roman, on the other hand, is distrusting and unstable. He doesn’t know the Lord. He lets his past mistakes and pain eat at him daily, unable to forgive or forget the horrible things he has done and seen in his young life. In and out of foster care during his childhood, running from the authorities, and tagging with graffiti in a gang, he is no stranger to the streets. No one knows his real name or the circumstances of his upbringing.

As Roman gets to know Grace, he starts to open up and question her about her devotion to God. When a new tragedy strikes, will Roman be strong enough to survive it?

Though this is a very long book, do not be intimidated. It only took me two days to read it, and I loved it. The story takes place in California and many of the landscapes and settings that are described are beautiful and breathtaking. The plot reads quickly, because it switches back and forth from present day back to the time when both Roman and Grace were children and teenagers. It is through the flashbacks that readers are able to get a better picture of the horrible things that Roman and Grace have both endured in their lives. I would highly recommend this novel for fans of Christian fiction, contemporary fiction, women’s fiction, romance, and even mainstream fiction. It has a little bit of everything between its covers. The ending was a tad bit predictable, but that was to be expected with the kind of story it is. Even so, it was rather enjoyable all the way to the last page.

Thank you to Tyndale House Publishers for the complimentary copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

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At the Edge of Summer by Jessica Brockmole

9780345547897_c667aAt the Edge of Summer will be published on May 17, 2016.

It is the summer of 1911, and 15 year old, Clare, is sent from her home in Scotland to Mille Mots, a castle in the French countryside. Her father passed away, so she was send to live with the Crepets, artists and friends of her mother. Clare’s mother, also an artist, disappeared when Clare was younger, leaving Clare with a feeling of being unwanted and unimportant.

At Mille Mots, she meets Luc, the only child of the Crepets. Luc is a few years older than Clare and he studies at the university. Clare is intrigued by Luc, who treats her as an equal and encourages her to be herself, teaching her how to draw and spending time getting to know her.

Just when Clare starts to feel at home with the Crepets and her feelings blossom for Luc, her grandfather shows up to take Clare with him on his journey through Portugal and Africa. Clare is once again thrust  into unfamiliar environments where she feels like an outsider looking in.

Fast forward a few years, as World War I is raging across the land and Luc and Clare have drifted apart, Luc is serving his country in battle. He thinks of Clare often and gets through some very hard days with the help of a friend and fellow soldier named Chaffre. Clare yearns for summer days spent with Luc, the one place she was truly ever happy – at Mille Mots. Thinking about Luc and hoping he makes it out of the war alive, she decides to take his advice and pursue study in art. She attends the Glasgow School of Art, and while there begins volunteering in a Paris studio where artists sculpt prosthetic pieces for injured soldiers. What she finds there will forever change the course of her future.

Brockmole does a fabulous job describing Paris, the French countryside, and the castle at Mille Mots. Readers can easily picture Clare’s surroundings and share in her feelings of loss and sadness when she must leave Mille Mots after such a memorable summer spent there.

The novel includes many letters between Luc and Clare over the years they are apart, some replies and some that go unanswered and unread. The letters add a richness to an already beautiful story line and budding romance.

Another aspect of the story which I really appreciated were the man/woman platonic friendships that both Luc and Clare had while they were apart. Luc became close with Mabel, a nurse who helped him so much after he was injured in the war. Clare is fortunate to meet and become close with Finlay, also an injured solder with a heart of gold. Without the support of Mable and Finlay, Luc and Clare may not have had the courage to find themselves or fight for the way back to each other.

Fans of historical fiction, fiction, and romance will surely enjoy this story. It is well written with an intriguing story line and beautiful descriptions of art and landscape.

 

 

I Let You Go by Clare Mackintosh

iletyougoI Let You Go will be published by Penguin Group on May 3, 2016.

Oh my goodness – this book is a roller-coaster ride! This book has it all – part police procedural, mystery, love story, and family drama. There are two story lines, both starting out with a tragic hit & run accident, killing a young boy named Jacob. Jenna Gray leaves her grief from losing her son and a fear-filled life for a remote seaside cottage on the Welsh coast. Meanwhile, seasoned police inspector, Ray, teams up with younger, beautiful inspector trainee, Kate, in an attempt to find the hit & run driver and bring some closure to Jacob’s mother. Ray’s home life is just about as stressful as his work life, due to the tension with his wife, a former police officer, and problems at school with his teenage son. Kate is young, energetic, easily accessible, and a great sounding board for Ray. Will he slip up and jeopardize his future, both at work and at home?

When Part 1 ended with a major twist, I had to go back and reread the first two chapters just to figure out what was going on. It really threw me for a loop, and after that I couldn’t put the book down. Part 2 picks up quickly, with jaw-dropping scenes and unimaginable, terrifying moments, as Jenna’s story is revealed piece by heartbreaking piece. The story line truly proves that things are not always what they seem.

This book made me cry for Jenna, and also gave me chills of terror. The writing is excellent, as even the ending leaves readers wondering if what people believed happened actually did transpire. Upon finishing, I was left with an unsettling, creepy feeling that can only be quelled with a sequel. I do hope Mackintosh writes many more novels. This is her first, and it’s an amazing accomplishment. Ray’s character reminds me a bit of Michael Connolly’s famous character, Harry Bosch. Fans of the Bosch series and of psychological thrillers such as The Girl on the Train, The Luckiest Girl Alive, and The Good Girl will enjoy this book. I highly recommend it.