The Captain’s Daughter by Meg Mitchell Moore Book Review & Giveaway

If anyone would like to escape to a quaint9780385541251_0df2c.jpg, picturesque coastal town in Maine for a while, then this is the book for you. Having stayed on a lobster wharf in a tiny little Maine town myself, this brought back great memories, as well as the strong yearning to visit again. There’s nothing quite like the crisp breeze and refreshingly clean smell of the ocean in Maine.

The Captain’s Daughter by Meg Mitchell Moore (published by Doubleday) releases on July 18, 2017. Eliza Barnes grew up in Little Harbor, Maine, a lobstering village that she was very eager to leave as soon as possible. Now married to her college boyfriend with two daughters, Eliza spends her time with other country club wives, sharing gossip and commiserating on the frustrations and woes of their high-society daily lives. Despite the years she has made a life in Boston, Eliza often feels like she is on the outside of the group, looking in, and that she doesn’t really belong in her current situation. Her lavishly wealthy mother-in-law, Judith, causes Eliza to feel even more like an outsider.

It appears that Eliza and Rob are happily-married, but Rob spends most of his time supervising contractor job sites of multi-million dollar homes and daydreaming on his pride and joy, a boat which is the most expensive, fanciest one in the harbor.

Eliza is forced to take a break from her life as she knows it when she receives an out-of-the-blue call from her ex and first love, Russell, with news that her father had an accident while out checking lobster traps on the Joanie B.  Eliza’s mother passed away from cancer when she was very young, which left Charlie and her mother’s best friend, Val, to raise Eliza. A hard worker, and never one to complain, Charlie getting hurt and calling the Coast Guard for help has Eliza more than a little concerned for her father’s health. Eliza drops everything and heads to Little Harbor, thinking she’ll be there for a few days, no sweat. However, when she arrives and realizes what is really going on with Charlie, it’s not going to be so easy leaving “home” again. When she was a teen, she couldn’t wait to leave Little Harbor, where everyone knew her business, but now that she is back, she realizes many of the things she missed over the years. To complicate matters, she is back on Russell’s home turf, and they were not on the best of terms when she left town years ago. Already on an emotional rollercoaster with her father, Eliza’s feelings for Russell and the secret they share from the past are brought to the surface once again. Now she finds herself wondering what could have been, if she had made a different choice so many years ago. Did she make a mistake? Can she make things right after all these years?

This novel has a little bit of everything for readers to enjoy. Strong themes of family, parenting, marriage, friendship, love, and forgiveness blend together in a beautiful tale about loving, losing, and finding the strength to keep living. It’s a perfect summer novel for those wanting to read something set near the beach. The story is intriguing and the descriptions of the setting are at times breathtaking, transporting the reader right into the lobster boat with Eliza or in the coffee shop with young Mary. I highly recommend this novel by Meg Mitchell Moore and hope you enjoy it as much as I did.

Many thanks to Doubleday for allowing me to giveaway some hardcover copies of The Captain’s Daughter. To be entered to win one of 3 copies, post a comment below. Winners will be chosen at random on 7/31/17 and notified by email. Good luck!

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One Perfect Lie by Lisa Scottoline

9781250099563_3fe1aOne Perfect Lie is due for publication from Macmillan on April 11, 2017.

I always enjoy Scottoline’s stand-alone novels. They are quick reads because they are hard to put down, with just enough mystery mixed into the story line to keep readers guessing until the very end. The topics of her novels are varied so that when you read them, it doesn’t feel like a mystery you’ve read many times already with the same general story line. I appreciate that, on account of the large number of mysteries that I read. Unique is good!

One Perfect Lie is trademark Scottoline – equal parts thrilling and entertaining. “Chris Brennan” has just secured a teaching job at Central Valley High School in Pennsylvania. Handsome, quick-witted, and perfect for the job, he is hired without much trouble. He’ll also be the assistant baseball coach, allowing him to get even closer to some of the students and find a much-needed baseball player to serve as a pawn . The only catch is that Chris isn’t a teacher at all, so why is he at Central Valley and what kind of game is he playing? As the intriguing stranger gets to know the students and their families, the mission he is on becomes a bit more personal, even if know one knows his real name or the reason he is hiding out at Central Valley as “Coach Brennan.”

Readers will find out Chris’s true identity and purpose about halfway through the novel, so I won’t reveal it here. What would be the fun in that?!  When one of his fellow teachers is found dead, the stakes increase and Chris has to decide what is most important to him – keeping the secrets and sticking to the mission or finally letting down his guard and feeling like he has a home. No family of his own, Chris grew up in foster care, leading him to live a pretty private adult life perfect for the type of work he is caught up in at Central Valley. He’s a very likable character, despite appearing to be the “bad guy” in the beginning of the story. Once you find out why Chris is at Central Valley, your opinion of him will likely change.

I will mention that there are quite a lot of other main characters in the story, including baseball players Jordan, Evan, and Raz and their respective families. There is even a hint of possible romance involved. Each of the young men and their family have their own unique situations and challenges. Scottoline weaves their stories in with Chris’s mission to add to the richness of the story. I just chose to focus my review on Chris’s character, but rest assured there is a lot going on in this story!

Thank you to Macmillan for the early review copy of this book.

Favorite Psychological Thrillers

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I’m sure you have heard the hype about Gone Girl by now. My personal opinion is that the book was way, WAY better than the movie. Also, I’ve read quite a lot of other psychological thrillers that I’ve loved even more than Gone Girl. It seems that whenever people describe this genre that Gone Girl is usually the example given. I think it’s time we show all these other amazing books some love! Below is a list of some of my favorite psychological thrillers (in no particular order). Many of these kept me awake at night!

Favorite Psychological Thrillers 

What are some of your favorite thrillers and/or suspenseful books? Please let me know in the comments!

 

 

Historical Fiction Favorites

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I’ve always loved historical fiction, especially WWII-era fiction. I can’t get enough of it!

Below, in no particular order (because I love them all so dearly), is a list of some of my favorite historical fiction books.

WWII era Historical Fiction Favorites

  • The Storyteller by Jodi Picoult
  • Lilac Girls by Martha Hall Kelly
  • The Auschwitz Escape by Joel C. Rosenberg
  • Letters to the Lost by Iona Gray
  • Salt to the Sea by Ruta Sepetys
  • The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah
  • The Orphan’s Tale by Pam Jenoff
  • The Girl in the Blue Coat by Monica Hesse
  • Water for Elephants by Sara Gruen
  • The Book Thief by Markus Zusak
  • Playing with Fire by Tess Gerritsen
  • The Cherry Harvest by Lucy Sanna
  • Orphan Train by Christina Baker Kline
  • Sarah’s Key by Tatiana de Rosnay
  • The Bronze Horseman by Paulina Simons
  • The Baker’s Secret by Stephen P. Kiernan
  • Everyone Brave is Forgiven by Chris Cleave
  • Mischling by Affinity Konar

Other Historical Fiction Favorites (not WWII era)

  • The Red Tent by Anita Diamant
  • The Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett
  • The Help by Kathryn Stockett
  • The Invention of Wings by Sue Monk Kidd
  • The Historian by Elizabeth Kostova
  • Circling the Sun by Paula McLain
  • The Obituary Writer by Ann Hood
  • To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

 

Please let me know in the comments if you have any favorites that I have not mentioned.  I would love to add them to my TBR pile!

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